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How to Create Your Own Online Training Courses

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How to Create Your Own Online Training Courses



Last Updated: Jun 2, 2020
Creating and selling training is one way to increase your income and promote your expertise. Here’s how to create your own online training courses and tips on how to deliver the courses.

From kindergarten through college and from continuing education to personal interest, people from all walks of life are searching for and enrolling in online education. Online training is being used to educate children, upskill employees, transform careers, and pursue personal development. Anyone with a teachable skill can set up their own online training school or teach their skill to eager students. The key is to develop a course that people are interested in and to find the right venue for that course.

There are three primary components to the successful development of any online training. These are:

The first step to developing an online course is to take personal inventory. What do you know, or what skill do you possess, that others might be interested in learning? Start by writing down everything you know and every skill you possess. Hold nothing back. Make it a brain dump.

Next, write down the potential audience for each thing you could teach. Whether it is specific knowledge—how wild birds mate, for instance—or specific skills, such as piano playing or business marketing, make a list of people groups (Moms, teenagers, business professionals, etc.) who might be interested in learning that skill or body of knowledge.

Thirdly, you can research the various places where online training courses are offered and choose one that would be appropriate for your online course. You can start with this list of online training course platforms.<!– –>

Once you’ve identified what you want to teach, who your audience is, and where you want to teach your course, you should start developing the course. Pertaining to venue, there is one other option available to you. If your course is specialized, you might consider offering that course through your own website, learning platform, or through email. Instructions on how to set that up will follow.

To start your own online training course and teach your expertise to others, follow these steps:

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that because a course is already available somewhere that another course like it can’t exist. No one is going to do it the way you do it. There are all kinds of courses, for instance, on HTML, but everyone carries the personality of its instructor. If you can find the students for your course, you can earn a nice side income and even promote your business by sharing your expertise.

Long before YouTube and TED created the burgeoning online video training movement, savvy entrepreneurs created their own electronic courses they delivered through email. If you have a website, you can still do this today. However, online video training has become much more powerful and much more popular.

There are three options for delivering your online training to your specialized audience:

To deliver a successful training course through email, you need an email service provider such as MailChimp or Constant Contact, and you need a website or landing page to drive traffic to in order to solicit signups. Make sure your email service provider has an autoresponder service that allows you to deliver email automatically in periodic increments. Follow the steps above to create your course, write it out as an autoresponder sequence, or upload it to your email service provider account.

With a membership website, you need a content management solution. The most popular open-source solution is WordPress. With plugins and specialized themes, you can create a membership website that allows you to charge a one-time, monthly, or annual fee that allows users to join your success and gain access to your educational material.

Follow the process for creating your training course and create the material behind a paywall. Then go and find your audience.

With a specialized platform, you’ll need to hire a professional website developer who will work with you to determine the necessary features for your platform and how it will look. This the most costly of your options, but it also has the best potential for setting your online training course up as unique and distinctive.

As online training continues to grow in popularity, there will be a growing need for qualified instructors ready to teach what they know. You could be one of them.<!– –>

© 2020 Attard Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved. May not be reproduced, reprinted or redistributed without written permission from Attard Communications, Inc.

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A Post-Pandemic Strategy for U.S. Higher Ed

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A Post-Pandemic Strategy for U.S. Higher Ed

Amid the Covid-19 pandemic, three external forces have come together to create a perfect storm for American colleges: The cost of higher education has been skyrocketing, a new generation of digital technologies — such as mobile, cloud computing, machine learning, AI, AR, and VR — have matured, so immersive and personalized education can be provided online at scale at a much lower cost than that of conventional education, and parents, students, faculty, and university leaders have significantly lowered their psychological barriers to online learning. University leaders must use what they are learning in crisis now to position their institutions for greatest impact in the decades to come. That means using data now from the current forced online learning experiment and initiating small pilots during the next academic year to test future higher education models. This article sets the agenda for university leaders to develop a point of view about the future which can guide short-term action. There are three paths they can take.

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Universities have many pressing short-term issues to deal with right now: large budget cuts, a growing reluctance among students to pay full tuition fees for online education, demands for reimbursement of already-paid fees, the possible disappearance of international students who pay full fees, the large-scale deferral of admissions, a sharp spike in the need for financial assistance among students because of the impact of the pandemic and ensuing recession, and finally, the question of whether and how to reopen.

Nevertheless, university leaders should not overspend their time on fighting fires and forget about the long term. The current crisis also creates opportunities to remake institutions. We provide a strategic framework for how universities must start considering their options, experimenting with alternatives, and start planning now.

Three external forces have come together to create a perfect storm for American colleges:

While the first two forces have been active for a while, now the Covid-19 crisis accelerated the urgency for change. University leaders must use what they are learning in crisis now to position their institutions for greatest impact in the decades to come. That means using data now from the current forced online learning experiment and initiating small pilots during the next academic year to test future higher education models. This article is intended to set the agenda for university leaders to develop a point of view about the future which can guide short-term action. They must choose between the three paths.

The world’s experiment with online teaching is making more apparent and salient the superior value proposition of immersive, four-year residential programs. Students get to live on college campuses, away from their families, perhaps for the first time in their lives, and engage in open-ended discussions, joint problem-solving, experience-based learning, and conflict management in classrooms (and in their dorms). Their interactions with other students generates confidence, brand loyalty, camaraderie, lifelong friendships, and a unique feeling of community. They develop communication skills, emotional intelligence, and networking skills. An intense residential experience builds in them a “sense of place,” which richly fosters identity and self-reliance.

For all its benefits, the four-year residential, immersive college experience comes with a high price tag and the superiority of personal, connected, and transformative experience of a four-year residential program should not be used as an argument to make it the only choice available for college education. Top-ranked universities with all their structural advantages — global brand recognition, access to world class scholar-teachers, prestigious employers, and influential alumni — now have the opportunity to explore how their recent experience with online learning can help strengthen their traditional model.

The heads of these institutions should be asking:

The current experiment with online teaching is providing universities with real-time data about which aspects of their courses can be substituted, which can be complemented or augmented, and which can’t be replaced by the digital medium. They must start determining the varying degrees of face-to-face, real-time virtual, and asynchronous-virtual experiences required for each course. Consider, for instance, physics. The basic concepts of mass, length, and time can be taught using graphics and the audio-visual techniques of a software program. Students can learn at their own pace, repeat as many times as required, do key-word searches, link concepts, and rearrange teaching modules based on the own skill levels. Nevertheless, certain aspects of learning physics need the hands-on experience of a lab. Courses such as Roman culture and democracy, which benefit from extensive discussion, can be taught through virtual meetings. In contrast, building a robot or learning ballet require the coming together of an instructor and fellow students at a common time.

Boards and university presidents should consider the following issues:

Take the case of hundreds of thousands of youngsters, straight out of high school and working for the minimum wage. For them, the escalating costs of higher education are unaffordable. Besides, they may not want to or be able to leave their jobs to attend college. There is a need for a good quality college education whose annual tuition cost is, say, under $5,000 and the degree is awarded by a reputed public university. Our current experience is providing ways to develop that solution. Online college degrees are not new but when reputed universities enter the space, it will be a game changer. Public universities must debate the following issues:

We do not believe that digital technologies will make obsolete the current university system. Consider retailing: Although Amazon started e-commerce almost 30 years ago, by 2019 online sales accounted for only 9% of total U.S. retail sales. Still, university leadership and faculty have individually responded to the shock of Covid-19 incredibly well, migrating to digital platforms in as little time as a week. The coming summer is a great opportunity to build on that momentum and transform higher education into something that is customizable and affordable to the vast majority of people. The time to act is now.

If our free content helps you to contend with these challenges, please consider subscribing to HBR. A subscription purchase is the best way to support the creation of these resources.

Vijay Govindarajan is the Coxe Distinguished Professor at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and Faculty Partner at the Silicon Valley incubator Mach 49. He is the author of The Three Box Solution. Follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Anup Srivastava holds Canada Research Chair in Accounting, Decision Making, and Capital Markets and is an Associate Professor at Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary. He examines the valuation and financial reporting challenges of digital companies.

A Post-Pandemic Strategy for U.S. Higher Ed

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Before You Buy an Inflatable Pool, Read This!

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Before You Buy an Inflatable Pool, Read This!

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For the past few summers, Dan Bailey has been helping his family beat the Texas heat by inflating and filling a backyard swimming pool.

“My family loves having a pool,” Bailey says in an email interview. “We had an in-ground pool at our old house, but it wasn’t in the cards when we moved. We’re all so glad to have an inflatable pool since the summers here are brutal. It’s nice to be able to take a swim.”

Although they offer a cooling dip at a reasonable price, inflatable pools can be tough to maintain for more than a season because of air leaks, which are a common complaint. Most inflatable pools are comprised of a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and rubber composite that is built up in layers. Purchasing an inflatable pool with multiple, separate air chambers may help minimize those inevitable leaks.

“We buy a new one most summers, unfortunately,” says Bailey, president of WikiLawn, a company that connects homeowners with lawn care professionals in their communities. “We had one summer where our inflatable pool actually held up just fine, but there’s always been an issue ever since.”

An inflatable pool can cost anywhere from $20 to more than $200, depending on size, and can be purchased from online retailers or brick-and-mortar stores. The depth of an inflatable pool generally varies from just a few inches to about 4 feet (a little over 1 meter) and the circumference can range up to about 10 feet (3.5 meters), which requires placement consideration.

“When buying an inflatable pool, I always look at the size first,” Bailey says. “I measure the space where it’s going to go and leave lots of room around it. I also consider how many people will be using it. Our son is old enough that he wants to have friends over, so we account for that, too.”

It’s also important to consider the area surrounding the pool. Although vinyl can be relatively durable, it is not impervious, so keep an eye out for nearby trees, shrubs or anything sharp that can puncture the pool, cause damage or become a safety hazard to people who are swimming, Bailey adds.

“There is no evidence that the virus that causes COVID-19 can be spread to people through the water in pools, hot tubs, spas, or water play areas,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on its website. “Proper operation and maintenance (including disinfection with chlorine and bromine) of these facilities should inactivate the virus in the water.”

This may be good news for backyard pool enthusiasts, but a DIY chemical concoction to disinfect swimming water needs to be undertaken with care. “Improper use of chemicals can lead to frustrated pool owners and costly pool repairs,” says Stewart C. Vernon, founder and COO of America’s Swimming Pool Company. “The wrong chemical combination can make your pool water cloudy, corrode pool surfaces and damage pool equipment.”

Vernon advises following CDC protocol in the water and near the water by social distancing and continuing safe hygiene practices, such as hand washing.

“Owners should routinely clean and disinfect their pools in an effort to keep the virus from spreading,” he adds.

An inflatable pool filled with sparkling, clear water is one of the most inviting things you can encounter on a hot, sunny day. However, water that looks clean can still harbor dangers. The water in swimming pools, even inflatable pools, can expose swimmers to Recreational Water Illnesses (RWIs) such cryptosporidium, which is the leading cause of swimming pool-related outbreaks of diarrheal illness.

Cryptosporidium and other RWIs are contracted when people swallow contaminated water, or breathe in contaminated droplets or mists when swimming. Those with weakened immune systems are most at risk, including pregnant women and people with chronic illnesses. Children are especially at risk because of their under-developed immune systems, and also because they are some of the most frequent users of inflatable pools.

Shouldn’t simply adding a few drops of chlorine make pool water safe for swimming? The answer, unfortunately, is more complicated than yes or no.

When chlorine is added to inflatable pool water with ideal pH levels, it will kill most germs — including E. coli — in less than an hour.

However, not all germs are killed by chlorine in the same amount of time. There are germs that take longer to kill, like cryptosporidium, which takes about 15,300 minutes (the equivalent of 10.6 days). Giardia, a parasite that causes painful abdominal cramps and persistent diarrhea, takes about 45 minutes to eradicate. The hepatitis A virus can remain active in pool water for more than 15 minutes after being treated with chlorine.

There’s also the matter of achieving a correct pH and disinfectant level, two factors that go hand-in-hand. The ideal pH for killing germs is between 7.2 and 7.8 parts per million, according to the CDC. This range also makes the water more comfortable for swimmers’ eyes and skin, which can be irritated by too much chlorine. Too little chlorine and the disinfectant’s germ-killing abilities become limited.

“In my experience, it’s really, really difficult to balance the pH of an inflatable pool,” Bailey says. “I have to check the levels and adjust them constantly. I ‘shock’ the pool once per week with a larger dose of chlorine, although the manufacturer recommended doing it once every two weeks, because algae kept growing excessively. I also use a manual pool skimmer to fish out debris. And sometimes, if all else fails, the pool needs to be drained.”

Periodically draining an inflatable swimming pool and letting it dry in the sun for a few hours not only provides a fresh start when you’re ready to refill it, but is key in preventing mosquito outbreaks. Moving water keeps mosquitoes from laying eggs (they prefer still water for their nurseries), so consider a portable fountain if you’ll be keeping water in the pool for more than a day or two.

Buying a large inflatable pool? Consider getting a manual or electric air compressor to help inflate it. Your lungs will thank you!

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Before You Buy an Inflatable Pool, Read This!

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Where to Find Online Training Courses

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Where to Find Online Training Courses



Last Updated: Jun 2, 2020
Where do you find good quality internet-based training courses? Here are ten popular platforms that cover a variety of subjects plus six specialty training sites.

Online education has been on the rise for several years now, but the COVID-19 pandemic has produced a huge surge of interest in online training programs in a number of ways. First, because many school districts shut down for the remainder of the school year in March, online K-12 education spiked, and the interest in primary education will likely continue even after the pandemic passes. Interest in online professional training, continuing education, and college courses have also been renewed.

Where are people going for this online training?

There are, of course, specialized platforms that allow prospective students to learn specific skills from subject matter pros. Here are a few specialty online training platforms you can try.

If there is anything you want to learn, there is likely a way to learn it online. You just have to find the right resource. And much of the training is free.

One category of online training is called Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). These are online training classes that are offered through some of the above platforms, and many of them offer certificates of completion or other proof of training. MOOCs are available to individuals and often to businesses so that employees can upskill. Some industries, such as real estate and accounting, have online training resources available for continuing education. Learn more about MOOCs at Mooc.org.

© 2020 Attard Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved. May not be reproduced, reprinted or redistributed without written permission from Attard Communications, Inc.

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How to “Re-engineer” Your Business for Safety

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How to “Re-engineer” Your Business for Safety

Process reengineering was a massive trend in the 1990s. By focusing on improving either cost, quality, or service, a company could gain benefits in all three categories. Today, the principles that underpin process reengineering can be applied anew, with safety as a core category to improve that will carry benefits across multiple other dimensions. By focusing on improving safety as companies begin to reopen — always while keeping the company’s purpose front and center — companies will gain benefits on four other dimensions. First, they can increase reach, by using virtual connections that attract customers who can’t be physically present. Second, they can create new customer experiences that consumers will want regardless of if they were created to overcome quarantine. Third, they can help re-invent the business as companies see new markets to serve through the lens of safety. Finally, they can improve costs.

At a time when companies are severely challenged, considering a safety reengineering effort may help create valuable new innovations, and revenue streams.

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If you’re old enough, you might remember back in the 1990’s a popular business trend called process re-engineering. If you’re not old enough to remember, this is what it was: Companies would look at core processes in terms of cost, quality, and service, then pick one of those three dimensions, reinvent the process around it, and gain benefits across all three dimensions. When done well, it works. I know this from personal experience. While CEO at Best Buy, for example, we worked with vendors, the supply chain, stores, and customers to improve the quality of getting TVs from manufacturers to our stores and finally to buyers. By drastically reducing the number of TVs damaged at any step in the process (quality), we reduced returns (costs) and increased customer satisfaction (service).

I was thinking about this idea recently in the context of the current Covid-19 crisis. I see an opportunity to apply the same principles behind process reengineering on a new dimension: safety. Conversations with fellow leaders have convinced me that a wave of process or product innovation driven by safety concerns can create benefits that go beyond safety. Importantly, it can help uncover and unleash the kind of growth and efficiency opportunities that will essential to offset what is likely to be a challenging environment for many companies.

Take Adobe, the digital creativity company. Before the Coronavirus crisis, they would hold an annual conference in Las Vegas for 15,000 people. This year, they could not physically gather their customers and partners, because of social distancing and safety concerns. They pivoted to an all-digital conference, and attendance skyrocketed to 80,000. By focusing on safety, the company removed meaningful barriers — attendees’ need to travel and the costs of doing that, and the restrictions of facilities where capacity couldn’t have accommodated the amazing turnout.

Or consider Best Buy. In April, the company decided to re-open some of its stores for one-on-one consultations. Shoppers can make appointments and arrive to a safe environment, with a limited number of people inside, all following social distancing guidelines. By reimagining the process of assisting customers and putting safety first, the company created a valuable, concierge-like experience with customers, with higher close rate as the shopper who makes an appointment is probably keen to get the solution they have been looking for, as opposed to simply browsing.

Applying process re-engineering principles to safety looks like this:

The first dimension this can help expand is reach. Adobe’s conference is a good example of this. Other companies are also discovering how digital conferencing and other technologies can bring people in who were simply, literally, out of reach before. For instance, many people around the world love Ralph Lauren’s flagship store on Madison Avenue in New York City, which is housed in a French Renaissance revival mansion. But, if you live in Minneapolis, you can only visit it infrequently. During the pandemic, Erik, one of the experienced sales people at the mansion began giving remote tours of the store and sharing his wardrobe suggestions. Whether or not the store is open to foot traffic, the store can vastly expand its reach to current and new customers. Similarly, consider the mission of the Minneapolis Institute of Art which is to “Inspire wonder through the power of art.” Driven by this purpose, the museum staff have responded to forced closure by launching a flurry of activities to allow the exploration of the museum’s collection from your home, browsing the museum’s collection by gallery or by object, creating podcasts and virtual events, and more.

The second dimension re-engineering for safety will help on is customer experience, as with Best Buy’s consultations. Customer experience in healthcare will benefit too. Telemedicine is experiencing a long-awaited boom, triggered by safety concerns, boosted by technological progress, and unlocked by the removal of regulatory barriers. Telemedicine allows patients with certain conditions to stay home but be seen by a medical practitioner, without the need to travel to a hospital or the office of their physician at a time when they least want to travel, as they are sick. Government is improving customer experience as well. New York state has streamlined administrative processes. Executive orders issued by Gov. Andrew Cuomo mean you no longer need the physical presence of a notary public to get a document notarized and, thanks to the New York City clerk’s Cupid application, you can get a marriage license without having to physically show up at the city clerk’s office. Let’s hope we never go back to the old ways!

Third, reengineering for safety can lead to a profound re-invention of the business. Connecting your company’s purpose to safety leads to breakthroughs. Best Buy’s purpose, for example, is not to sell electronics. It’s to “enrich lives through technology by addressing key human needs.” With this purpose in mind, the company had already started before the Coronavirus crisis to launch a program to help seniors stay in their homes longer by deploying remote monitoring technology for them. This remote monitoring is good for seniors and their care givers, and helps reduce costs. In the context of the crisis, it provides safety for the seniors who can stay home, avoiding hospitals that put them at high risk of infection, and help hospitals keep patient numbers manageable.

If the Minneapolis Institute of Art’s purpose was “to be a museum,” it’s hard to imagine how it could re-invent itself in a pandemic. But in fact its mission is to “inspire wonder through the power of art.” In this light, with the building closed for safety reasons, you can begin to imagine how it can create new offerings — such as virtual classes — for a variety of populations, including disadvantaged, remote groups of individuals. There is also of course the example of restaurants who have developed a pickup or delivery service, or even a new business around delivering the food ingredients to recreate at home their most believed recipes, which can allow them to reach a population in excess of their seating capacity. And, if you consider that Axa is not an insurance company, but a company whose mission is to “help customers live their lives with more peace of mind by protecting them, their relatives and their property against risks, and by managing their savings and assets,” which again opens a world of possibilities, such as creating preparedness and prevention services.

The fourth dimension safety re-engineering can help with is costs. Many companies have now realized how effective they can be by working remotely from home and save on corporate travel, meetings and events, and ultimately office space. The cost savings from these new ways of working are material over time.

While it is early in this new world to assess with confidence the effectiveness, sustainability, and economics of some of these innovations, borrowing on the decades-old idea of process re-engineering in the context of safety and purpose has the potential to help companies generate valuable revenue streams at a time when many companies will be severely challenged. Even though these concepts were born out of necessity in a pandemic, there’s no reason they can’t continue as the world resumes. What these organizations are learning now can help make a difference even when it’s not the only option.

If our free content helps you to contend with these challenges, please consider subscribing to HBR. A subscription purchase is the best way to support the creation of these resources.

Hubert Joly is the Executive Chairman and former CEO of Best Buy

How to “Re-engineer” Your Business for Safety

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Manancy

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Right breast cancer.

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2 posts since

2 Jun 2020

Diagnosed and of last month. Just a week after mammogram, biospy and scan all in one afternoon. Really scary and anxious. On medication which I started the next day. Now got date for op, which is more scary. Cannot decide on lumpectomy or mastectomy. Just too worried. 

14 posts since

23 Dec 2019

I’m due to have my mastectomy this month without the choice I’m scared it’s major surgery and I don’t cope well with pain. I’ve posted on here also for some tips and experiences of others who have gone through the same.

215 posts since

22 Aug 2019

Hi Manancy,

Appreciate you’re worried and anxious but I strongly recommend taking some time to research the options you’ve been given and consider how these fit into your priorities in life. Its unfortunate but sometimes people find themselves pushed to make a decision as time can be tight and without adequate homework may make a decision they later regret….if you’re in this situation challenge your team to help you and push back if you feel too pressured.

 Regarding “research” have a look on here, also you may find MacMillan & Breast care now websites/helplines useful – avoid most of the suggestions on google as they can be ill informed & out of date.

Breast care now offer a “someone like me” service where you can talk to those who have been through the options you’re being given – that may help?

In my opinion (and its only my opinion!) mastectomy is more belt & braces and may put your mind at rest re any recurrence (though it may not recur of course) but is obviously a much more invasive operation and will take more recovery time.  Also would you want any reconstruction?  You may not need with a lumpectomy.

I’d also ask your BC support team to run through the pros & cons for you in terms of post operation & longer term outlook given your diagnosis as different BC types can impact in different ways in the longer term.  Ask them what the chances are of needing a mastectomy following a lumpectomy as it does happen.

 

Sorry but there’s lots for you to think about & decide, like Lupita I didn’t have a choice in the RHS so easier in many ways.  I would however point out that the mastectomy operation is really straight forward and not very painful in itself, I was feeling quite able after 4 weeks (though still recovering), I had a lumpectomy in LHS and that was really straight forward with very short recovery time (hardly noticeable but then I did have RHS missing!).

Good luck with whichever you decide.

Sam

 

5 posts since

3 Jun 2020

Hello – if you have a choice, my advice is go large. Reconstruction easy-peasy these days, so maximise your chance of getting the whole lot first time. The whole thing is bloody terrifying. I wanted both breasts off straight away I was so scared. But they said that really wasn’t necessary. I had a lumpectomy on the advice of the surgeon with some lymph nodes taken to check for spread. I like my smaller breast a lot although it’s barely noticeable! The surgeon says she can make the other one smaller to match if I choose. 

Right breast cancer.

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JoanneH88

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JoanneH88

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Rosieposie27

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We know it’s a worrying time for people with cancer. Please read our information about coronavirus and cancer alongside this page. If you have symptoms of cancer you should still contact your doctor and go to any appointments you have. Spotting cancer early means treatment is more likely to be successful.

Read about coronavirus and cancer

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We know it’s a worrying time for people with cancer. Please read our information about coronavirus and cancer alongside this page. If you have symptoms of cancer you should still contact your doctor and go to any appointments you have. Spotting cancer early means treatment is more likely to be successful.

Read about coronavirus and cancer

Bmt2002

Research & References of Bmt2002|A&C Accounting And Tax Services
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